Meh, it's Monday // Goddess in Green

Good morning, Early Birds, and good night to those of you who are not yet in bed!

Today I got up at 9, had planned to begin the day with a work out session. Lesson of the day: Never do anything without caffeine in your system. Cause whatever you're trying to do - you'll fail at it. Miserably. Seriously, I wasn't even in the mood to stretch, and I'm always in the mood to stretch! =/

So now I'm sitting at the kitchen table with a fresh pot of coffee next to me, trying to decide on what to make me for breakfast... Right now I'm craving scrambled eggs, I think I'mma scramble me some eggs...

I'm wearing green today. Two green tank tops - as one of them is see-through, a green hoodie, and mint green socks. Maybe I should go and change out of my blue Levi's and into my green skirt as well? Hahah, Boyfriend should see me then, we'd match (as he's currently wearing his green military uniform)!!

My stomach is growling. I'd better get the breakfast going. I've been real good though, haven't eaten candy, cookies, waffles, pancakes (unhealthy chocolate chip breakfast pancakes), ice cream... or anything like that since June. I know it's only July 4th, but the first  two weeks are the hardest.


 

OMG it's the 4th of July! Happy Birthday, America, my beloved! <3

Like two days ago, I found this thing on Facebook; Seven Quick Facts About 4th of July:

1. It wasn't actually July 4
The 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence did not sign at the same time, nor did they sign on July 4, 1776. The official event occurred on August 2, 1776, when 50 men signed it.

2. John Adams thought July 2 would be remembered
John Adams had written to his wife Abigail: "The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival..."

3. The Liberty Bell
The Liberty Bell sounded from the tower of Independence Hall on July 8, 1776, summoning citizens to gather for the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence by Colonel John Nixon.

4. The last signing was 6 months later
Thomas McKean was the last to sign the Declaration of Independence in January, 1777.

5. Where did the word Patriotism come from
The word "patriotism" comes from the Latin patria, which means ?homeland? or "fatherland".

6. Jefferson and Adams died 50 years later
Both Thomas Jefferson and John Adams died on Independence Day, July 4, 1826, 50 years after the first Independence Day.

7. When did it become an official holiday
In 1941, Congress declared 4th of July a federal legal holiday.


 

On to something else... I decided to google "When to capitalize in headline" and found this:

Which words in a title (of a book, article, essay, movie, song) should be capitalized?

For an answer, let's turn to the "World's Most Authoritative Newspaper" (and the owner of About.com). Take a good look at three headlines from the front page of a recent issue of The New York Times:
? Supplier Under Scrutiny on Aging Arms for Afghans
?  INQUIRY ASSAILS ACCOUNT FIRM IN LENDER'S FALL
?  Equity Loans As Next Round In Credit Crisis

The first headline employs a common form of title case, capitalizing "all nouns, pronouns and verbs, and all other words of four or more letters"--just as the convention is described in The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage (Random House, 1999).

However, the second headline employs all capital letters (or majuscules, if you like technical terms). And the third uses a version of title case with the initial letter of every word capitalized, even though the Times Manual insists that as and in should be in lowercase.

I think that's interesting, because this is the English rule (In Norwegian, only first letter of sentence is capitalized, unless there's a name in there) and so many English speaking people don't even know it.

Now I've tortured my poor stomach long enough. Time to get me some fooooood!!



Any plans for this rainy Moday?
Are you celebrating the 4th of July?

♥ The Norwegian Teenager

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a teenager with thoughts ©

a teenager with thoughts ©

19, Ørland

This is an anonymous blog by a Norwegian teenage girl. I may reveal myself someday, but for now my identity shall remain unknown for those of you who do not already know who I am. I'll explain all of that later. Please leave a comment so I can see you've visited, in whichever language you prefer!

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